The influence of the Annual Review of Biochemistry spread far and wide, including its use as a teaching aid by WWII POW Samuel Perry. This excerpt is taken from Perry's obituary in the Daily Telegraph, 2010:

“His love of biochemistry, helped to sustain him during his 1,165 days as a prisoner. He ran courses in biochemistry and agricultural chemistry, and requested that some biochemical literature be sent out to him in prison in Padula. With the help of the Red Cross, the Annual Review of Biochemistry of 1942, volume 11, reached the camp. After each of his failed escapes he miraculously managed to retrieve the book, even took it home with him to Britain after liberation. This much-travelled volume, now in the archives of of the Biochemical Society, became, as he drily put it, ‘a monument to my incompetence as an escapee’”.



1“Science, Government and Information: The Responsibilities of the Technical Community and the Government in the Transfer of Information,” issued by the U.S. President’s Scientific Advisory Committee.